Tuesday, December 30, 2014

14 ways to make money from one song

14 ways to make money from one song

DECEMBER 12, 2014{ 2 COMMENTS }
14 ways to make money from one song[This post was written by Bobby Borg and it originally appeared on the SonicBids Blog.]
As with any business, your products and services (whether they be your recordingstoursmerch, or anything else) are the stars of the show. They generate revenue and keep your music career afloat. This is why it’s so important to push the boundaries of innovation and creativity and find a variety of ways to satisfy your audience and make sales.
Take a song, for instance. It can be recorded and simply released as a single, but that’s not all.

Here’s how to turn a single song into 14 different money-making revenue streams:

1. If you remix it and take the lyrics away, it’s now an instrumental version that can be licensed to film and TV.
2. If you re-record it live, you can release that version as a live single.
3. If you re-record it acoustically, it can now be sold as the unplugged version.
4. If you sing it in another language, it is now a translation suitable for new markets.
5. If you remix it with a guest DJ, it can now be the electronic dance version.
6. If you compile it with six or 10 other songs, it can become part of an album or compilation.
7. If you offer the recorded stems to your individual track, it can be an “interactive product” where fans can create new mixes and share them with each other.
8. If you allow the song to be experienced (heard, critiqued) in real-time during the writing and production phase, it can be an exclusive content perk to paying fan club members.
9. If you take the words from the song’s chorus and place them on T-shirts and hats, it becomes a cool piece of merch.
10. If you create a video of the song being performed and/or acted out, it can be part of a DVD collection of video singles with other songs and/or used as a tool to generate advertising revenue on video sites.
11. If you film yourself while writing and recording the songit can be part of your “making of” video.
12. If you transcribe the music into printed form, it can be a piece of sheet music.
13. If you keep the broken drumsticks, skins, picks, and other tools that were used during the recording of the song, they can be sold as collectors’ items.
14. If you pile a number of the items discussed above into a classy box, it can be a cool limited box set that your fans might find as a great value and must-have item.
The same concept can be applied to your music lesson business (offered at home, on DVD, in an instructional book, in a master class clinic, streaming live online, etc.) or to any other product or service.
The point is that with a little creativity, one product can be turned into a variety of extensions. This doesn’t necessarily mean that the more products you offer, the better – in fact, that could actually create confusion for your fans. Rather, if you can keep the juices of creativity and innovation always flowing by being open-minded and observing what’s around you at all times, you can better satisfy the needs of your fans and serve others you may not be reaching currently with quality offerings. 
That’s how you can generate even more income for your music career.
Just remember that if you take your music career seriously, it’s a business – and the purpose of a business is to make a healthy profit. If it’s not profitable, it’s not a business – it’s just a hobby.
Bobby Borg is the author of Music Marketing For The DIY Musician: Creating and Executing a Plan of Attack On A Limited Budget (September 2014). Find the book on Hal Leonard’s website under “Trade Books” or on Amazon. Signed copies with a special offer are also available at bobbyborg.com.

Saturday, December 20, 2014

This Band Just Finished A 28 Day Tour And Made How Much?!



pomplamoose_main
The following is by 1/2 of the band Pomplamoose and Patreon co-founder, Jack Conte.
Pomplamoose just finished a 28-day tour. We played 24 shows in 23 cities around the United States. It was awesome: Nataly crowd surfed for the first time ever, we sold just under $100,000 in tickets, and we got to rock out with people we love for a full month. We sold 1129 tickets in San Francisco at the Fillmore. I’ll remember that night for the rest of my life.
One question that our fans repeatedly asked us was “what does it feel like to have ‘made it’ as a band?” Though it’s a fair question to ask of a band with a hundred million views on YouTube, the thought of Pomplamoose having “made it” is, to me, ridiculous.
Before I write another sentence, it’s important to note that Nataly and I feel so fortunate to be making music for a living. Having the opportunity to play music as a career is a dream come true. But the phrase “made it” does not properly describe Pomplamoose. Pomplamoose is “making it.” And every day, we bust our asses to continue “making it,” but we most certainly have not “made it.”

Being in an indie band is running a never-ending, rewarding, scary, low-margin small business.

In order to plan and execute our Fall tour, we had to prepare for months, slowly gathering risk and debt before selling a single ticket. We had to rent lights. And book hotel rooms. And rent a van. And assemble a crew. And buy road cases for our instruments. And rent a trailer. And….
All of that required an upfront investment from Nataly and me. We don’t have a label lending us “tour support.” We put those expenses right on our credit cards. $17,000 on one credit card and $7,000on the other, to be more specific. And then we planned (or hoped) to make that back in ticket sales.
We also knew that once we hit the road, we would be paying our band and crew on a weekly basis. One week of salaries for four musicians and two crew members (front of house engineer and tour manager) cost us $8794. That came out to $43,974 for the tour.
We built the tour budget ourselves and modeled projected revenue against expenses. Neither of us had experience with financial modeling, so we just did the best we could. With six figures of projected expenses, “the best we could” wasn’t super comforting.

The tour ended up costing us $147,802 to produce and execute.

Where did all those expenses come from? I’m glad you asked:

Expenses

$26,450
Production expenses: equipment rental, lights, lighting board, van rental, trailer rental, road cases, backline.
$17,589
Hotels, and food. Two people per room, 4 rooms per night. Best Western level hotels, nothing fancy. 28 nights for the tour, plus a week of rehearsals.
$11,816
Gas, airfare, parking tolls. Holy shit, parking a 42-foot van is expensive.
$5,445
Insurance. In case we break someone’s face while crowdsurfing.
$48,094
Salaries and per diems. Per diems are twenty dollar payments to each bandmate and crew member each day for food while we’re out. Think mechanized petty cash.
$21,945
Manufacturing merchandise, publicity (a radio ad in SF, Facebook ads, venue specific advertising), supplies, shipping.
$16,463
Commissions. Our awesome booking agency, High Road Touring, takes a commission for booking the tour. They deserve every penny and more: booking a four week tour is a huge job. Our business management takes a commission as well to do payroll, keep our finances in order, and produce the awesome report that lead to this analysis. Our lawyer, Kia Kamran, declined his commission because he knew how much the tour was costing us. Kia is the man.
Fortunately, Pomplamoose made some money to offset some of these expenses. Let’s look at our income from the tour:

Income

$97,519
Our cut of ticket sales. Dear fans, you are awesome. We love every ounce of your bodies. You’re the reason we can tour. Literally, 72% of our tour income came from the tickets you bought. THANK YOU.
$29,714
Merch sales. Hats, t-shirts, CDs, posters. 22% of our tour income.
$8,750
Sponsorship from Lenovo. Thank goodness for Lenovo! They gave us three laptops (to run our light show) and a nice chunk of cash. We thanked them on stage for saving our asses and supporting indie music. Some people think of brand deals as “selling out.” My guess is that most of those people are hobby musicians, not making a living from their music, or they’re rich and famous musicians who don’t need the income. If you’re making a living as an indie band, a tour sponsor is a shining beacon of financial light at the end of a dark tunnel of certain bankruptcy.
The Bottom Line
Add it up, and that’s $135,983 in total income for our tour. And we had $147,802 in expenses.

We lost $11,819.

But this isn’t a sob story. We knew it would be an expensive endeavor, and we still chose to make the investment. We could have played a duo show instead of hiring six people to tour with us. That would have saved us over $50,000, but it was important at this stage in Pomplamoose’s career to put on a wild and crazy rock show. We wanted to be invited back to every venue, and we wanted our fans to bring their friends next time. The loss was an investment in future tours.
At the end of the day, Pomplamoose is just fine: our patrons give us $6,326 per video through ourPatreon page. We sell about $5,000 of music per month through iTunes and Loudr. After all of our expenses (yes, making music videos professionally is expensive), Nataly and I each draw a salary of about $2,500 per month from Pomplamoose. What’s left gets reinvested in the band or saved so that we don’t have to rack up $24,000 of credit card debt to book another tour.
In 2014 Nataly and I didn’t take weekends off. Releasing two, fully produced music videos per month is way more than a full time job. Because Pomplamoose doesn’t have a manager, Nataly coordinated the logistics of the tour, herself. On top of that, we recorded and released a full length album. Our music video shoots often started at 9 am and finished at 2 am. That was the norm, not the exception.
The point of publishing all the scary stats is not to dissuade people from being professional musicians. It’s simply an attempt to shine light on a new paradigm for professional artistry.

We’re entering a new era in history: the space between “starving artist” and “rich and famous” is beginning to collapse.

YouTube has signed up over a million partners (people who agree to run ads over their videos to make money from their content). The “creative class” is no longer emerging: it’s here, now.
We, the creative class, are finding ways to make a living making music, drawing webcomics, writing articles, coding games, recording podcasts. Most people don’t know our names or faces. We are not on magazine covers at the grocery store. We are not rich, and we are not famous.
We are the mom and pop corner store version of “the dream.” If Lady Gaga is McDonald’s, we’re Betty’s Diner. And we’re open 24/7.
We have not “made it.” We’re making it.
Jack Conte is the co-founder and CEO of Patreon and 1/2 of the band Pomplamoose. 

Sunday, December 7, 2014

Vintage Motorcycle and Scooter Show

Vintage Motorcycle and Scooter Showwww.cafemotoclub.com Cafe*Moto and Ace Cafe Orlando 2nd ANNUAL REVIVAL RALLY---A little bit of everything Triumph, Ducati, Moto Guzzi and ELGI-Vincent